Virtual Reality

Leap Motion, Proprioception, and the Jenga Test

Leap Motion, Proprioception, and the Jenga Test

Leap Motion quickly recognized that hand tracking is a huge and important problem to solve in virtual and augmented reality, and their sensor is uniquely well designed for the problem. This is in part related to the emergence of VR/AR headsets like Oculus and Meta. It's a great story; many cool hardware innovations have no real defined use case until a developer community joins the party. What Leap learned from their community was that their hardware filled a gaping hole in VR interface control devices.

Microsoft Hololens - Augmented Reality That Will Make You Crap Your Pants

I'm excited about the Microsoft Hololens. And here's why. Virtual reality allows designers and developers to create completely new realms and experiences, include participants remotely in believable 3D environments, and even recreate events in ways that are as emotive and visceral as if you were actually there. But the Hololens isn't offering virtual reality. It's offering augmented reality; ie: way better reality. And reality is something we can share, in real places, in real time.

That time we made an amusement park ride with no money...

That time we made an amusement park ride with no money...

In 2011, when we were just a budding company with no real business model, we jumped at any chance to create an experiential installation. When our friends Kurt Firla and Elliot Mealia called and asked if we wanted to create an amusement park ride that videomapped a TTC streetcar and took riders on a fantastic voyage around Toronto, (including stops under the lake, inside a giant raccoon, and through time and space), we obviously had to say yes.